Field

Regulatory Burden

Regulatory burden is imposed when regulation and policies are implemented and increase the amount of paperwork, cost and time for businesses to operate.  In agriculture, regulatory burden can be imposed by varying levels of government: municipal, provincial and federal.  Some issues can be multi-jurisdictional which further complexes the burden.

The reasons that regulations are burdensome to agriculture are varying.  Outdated regulations can limit growth and often don’t reflect the current direction of the industry.  For example, crown corporations like the Nova Scotia Crop and Livestock Insurance Commission and the Nova Scotia Farm Loan Board require an Order in Council for some decisions that could be effectively made by the boards which know the industry.  Federally, strategies coming into place like the Healthy Eating Strategy have the potential to negatively impact sectors of the agriculture industry.  Cross jurisdictional regulations like food safety can cause confusion when deciding which regulations, if any, a farm must follow in order to access market(s).  In addition to regulations, public policy and inconsistent service delivery creates burdens as well.

Regulatory burden has been a Standing Policy of the Federation for a long time.  New regulations and changes to existing regulations are inevitable; however, should be implemented in such as way that minimally impacts farmers, farm families and farm operations.  NSFA regularly collaborates with other stakeholders – Canadian Federation of Agriculture, commodity organizations and others – to ensure that impact is minimal and that changes are warranted.  Additionally, when service delivery is inconsistent across Nova Scotia, NSFA advocates to rectify the situation.

 

Policy Statement

It shall be the policy of the Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture to continue to monitor, participate and communicate changes to regulations at the provincial and federal levels that will impact agriculture.  NSFA will also advocate for an increase in the lending limit for Nova Scotia Farm Loan Board, and for the NSCLIC Board to determine key reporting deadlines.